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The only reason your CSS fails

Echo JS - Sat, 02/09/2019 - 18:35
Categories: Web Technologies

Importing Data from MongoDB to MySQL: BSON Data Types

MySQL Server Blog - Fri, 02/08/2019 - 13:37

The latest release of the MySQL Shell 8.0.14 (GA) improved the JSON import utility to support the conversion of more BSON data types from the strict mode representation of MongoDB Extended JSON. This removes a previous limitation regarding the import of more complex MongoDB data types to MySQL, making it more reliable.…

Categories: Web Technologies

Using Dotfiles for Managing Development and Many Other Magical Things

CSS-Tricks - Fri, 02/08/2019 - 07:29

Howdy folks! 🎉 I'm Simon Owen, and over the years, I've loved being a part of and learning from the dotfiles community. I spend a lot of time teaching developers and running workshops. In those sessions, demonstrating how I set up my development environment is often one of things that folks appreciated the most.

Dotfiles are a key part of my development environment. Haven’t heard of them? Well, even if you have, it’s a good idea to walk through what they are and the benefits of using them.

Last year, I set myself a goal to create a screencast series. If you like this article and want to find out more, please subscribe to the mailing list and get the download link. If you really like it, you can also 🦄 donate here! 🦄

A dot-what-file?

If you’re hearing about dotfiles for the first time, it’s totally fine to be confused about what they are and what they do. I recall that it took me a considerable amount of time before I realized a dotfile is simply a file that has a dot in front of the file name!

There are two common examples of dotfiles. First, the ones you might already be familiar with are those often found at the root of many open source projects — for example, .editorconfig contains code editor preferences to help maintain consistent coding styles for a project. You may also have seen .stylelintrc and .eslintrc floating around, which set CSS and JavaScript rules, respectively.

Second (and the ones we’re looking at today), are dotfiles that can live at the root level of a user directory (i.e. /Users/<username> ). One such dotfile is .aliases, which contains custom named commands that can speed up work in the Terminal. Another is .bash_prompt, which is used to change the $ in Terminal to something a little more fun. In my case, I set it so this dude pops up to make me smile when things get tough:

༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ

Hopefully, you’re already starting to get a good sense of how useful dotfiles can be. They’re sort of like hidden gems (literally, since they’re hidden from views by default) that unlock superpowers for your machine to help with development. We’re talking about automation, optimizations, and efficient workflows, among other things.

First, I want to give props to the dotfiles community

Before we dig into dotfiles, it’s worth calling out how great the community behind them is. When I first forked Paul Irish’s dotfile repo, there was a lot going on in there I didn’t understand. Mathias Bynens and Paul Irish helped me immensely by answering questions about the code and it was their willingness to help that served as one of the reasons I became drawn to both the concept and the community.

Sometimes, I’ll post something to the community that I’d like to automate, but can’t figure it out for the life of me. And, without fail, I’ll get a helpful reply. Case in point: Eric Czarny wrote an app for me to automate my Spectacle settings and Mathias also contributed a code snippet. How cool is that?!

Then there are things like macOS updates. The dotfiles community is often on top of this and provide useful advice on GitHub comments regarding anything that no longer works or other useful information. You can then amend your dotfiles accordingly, such as adding the following code that increases the sound quality for Bluetooth headphones/headsets:

defaults write com.apple.BluetoothAudioAgent "Apple Bitpool Min (editable)" -int 40 Digging into dotfiles

The code example above might look a bit familiar to you. It’s along the same lines as this often-used one to show hidden files:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -bool true

...or this one to add spaces to the dock:

defaults write com.apple.dock persistent-apps -array-add '{"tile-type"="spacer-tile";}'; killall Dock

These commands can be pasted directly into the Terminal. As you might expect, something like -bool true will change a boolean value from false to true and reset the command for later use.

If you’e like me and have a lot of these commands, then this is where the .macos (previously .osx) dotfile becomes especially useful. Instead of copying and pasting each command individually, we can automate and run all of them in one go.

Let’s walk through some examples

There are so many awesome things we can do in dotfiles. Here are some practical use cases that I rely on for my day-to-day work.

Setting aliases for default commands (.aliases)

Navigating between directories in the Terminal can be cumbersome and it’s easy to get lost in cd madness.

We can replace the standard “change directory" (cd) command with a custom command in the .aliases dotfile. For example, use this alias to ditch the cd prefix altogether when using the command cd .. to move up a directory in favor of .. by itself.

alias ..="cd .."

Sure, it’s only dropping two letters, but how much easier is that to remember?

We can do the same thing to make shortcuts to certain directories:

alias dl="cd ~/Downloads"

Or, create aliases for shorthand command tasks:

alias hs="hexo serve"

Oh, here’s another one! List only directories:

alias lsd="ls -lF ${colorflag} | grep --color=never '^d'" Make a custom bash prompt for a personal touch to the Terminal (.bash_prompt)

I referenced this a little earlier, but here’s how I turned my bash prompt ($) into a little dude that’s way more fun to look at it. This is done directly in the .bash_prompt dotfile.

PS1="༼ つ ◕_◕ ༽つ" Create Git shortcuts to speed up commits (.gitconfig)

We can make it a little more efficient to commit all changes at once in the .gitconfig dotfile. Using ca is a lot more concise than !git add -A && git commit -av .

ca = !git add -A && git commit -av

Another handy shortcut: find commits by commit message.

fm = "!f() { git log --pretty=format:'%C(yellow)%h %Cblue%ad %Creset%s%Cgreen [%cn] %Cred%d' --decorate --date=short --grep=$1; }; f" Automate common Homebrew tasks (brew.sh)

Use Homebrew for package management? Although not strictly a dotfile (it doesn’t have a dot before the file name), Homebrew gives us the brew.sh shell script file. This file automates the installation and management of Apps and Tools:

brew install git brew install tree brew cask install google-chrome brew cask install iterm2 brew cask install sublime-text Protect your Git credentials (.extra)

Hide information you don't want to share publicly in one file in a private repo and bring it in for you alone. For example, a good idea for this file is anything that’s specific to you, such as your Git credentials. This will prevent people from cloning, running your dotfiles, then committing as you!

# Git credentials # Not in the repository, to prevent people from accidentally committing under my name GIT_AUTHOR_NAME="Simon Owen" GIT_COMMITTER_NAME="$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME" git config --global user.name "$GIT_AUTHOR_NAME" GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL="<ADD-YOUR-EMAIL-HERE>" GIT_COMMITTER_EMAIL="$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL" git config --global user.email "$GIT_AUTHOR_EMAIL" Write custom functions for tasks (.functions)

Dotfiles are more than shortcuts and aliases. We can also make custom functions in .functions that do more advanced lifting. For example, create a new directory and change directory to it:

function mkd() { mkdir -p "$@" && cd "$_"; }

Or, we can open a given location in Finder with a one-letter command (o):

function o() { if [ $#-eq 0 ]; then open .; else open "$@"; fi; } Specify your $PATH and keep private (.path)

$PATH allows the running of executable files. Instead of navigating to each path manually in Terminal, here we can set the file paths so they can run the executable files directly. It might be the case that this file contains sensitive information. As such, this file is often kept in a private repo.

Here’s an example adding ~/utils to the $PATH:

export PATH="$HOME/utils:$PATH" Force Vim to use a particular theme (.vimrc)

Editor config files are great for ensuring consistent formatting across projects, but we can also tell a Vim editor to use a specific theme in a .vimrc file:

" Use the Solarized Dark theme set background=dark colorscheme solarized let g:solarized_termtrans=1 Bonus: Helpful Terminal recipes for macOS

OK, so here’s a little bit of a bonus for Mac users that isn’t related to dotfiles, but are things we can do in the Terminal to give macOS superpowers to do pretty awesome things that make day-to-day use a little easier and more pleasant.

First off, we can show hidden files by default in the Finder so dotfiles are visible all the time by typing this into the Terminal:

defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles -bool true

Find the way that scrollbars toggle on and off in Finder jarring? Let’s make them visible at all times:

defaults write NSGlobalDomain AppleShowScrollBars -string "Always"

By default, macOS checks for software updates once per week. But maybe we want to check once a day or at some other interval:

defaults write com.apple.SoftwareUpdate ScheduleFrequency -int 1

You know how holding down on a keyboard key repeats that character? Well, it repeats at a determined speed that we can supercharge to blazingly fast:

defaults write NSGlobalDomain KeyRepeat -int 0

Some people love the way macOS includes a box shadow when taking a screenshot of a window. Others don’t. Here’s how to turn it off:

defaults write com.apple.screencapture disable-shadow -bool true

And, in this example, we can automate the size of icons in the Dock:

defaults write com.apple.dock tilesize -int 36

This is only the tip of the iceberg! In my screencast series I go over more than one hundred of them.

Conclusion

Web development is increasingly more complicated as time goes on. We all have ways of making our development workflow a little easier and comfortable based on personal preferences.

You may be a seasoned developer and aware of such things as Node, npm, and Git but still find yourself stuck in a Terminal window with a bunch of errors. Or, you might be starting out and find these, and other tools, complex and tough to grasp.

Either way, hopefully knowing more about dotfiles and what they’re capable of doing gives you a new weapon in your arsenal to make your development environment tailored to you, speed up your workflow and give your machine added superpowers!

As a reminder, my screencast series will give you more tips and tricks, plus a good idea of how to get your development environment set up. This is the first in the series. Going forwards, I'm going to look at expanding on it, so please let me know if there's anything else you'd like me to cover!

The post Using Dotfiles for Managing Development and Many Other Magical Things appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Categories: Web Technologies

Revisiting the abbr element

CSS-Tricks - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 12:58

An irresistible HTML element deep dive from Ire Aderinokun, this time on the <abbr title=""> element for abbreviations. You can kinda just use it (JUI) and it works fine, but if you're hoping to make a tooltip for them (which works on touchscreens as well), then it's much more complicated.

The end result is leaving the semantic HTML alone and progressively enhancing with ~50 lines of JavaScript that adds interactive wrapper elements and event handlers.

I feel like this is the perfect sort of thing to be made into a web component that could/should be widely distributed for use. Maybe a <a11y-abbr> component or something. Can you have web components extend other native HTML elements though? If not, I guess it's kinda falling back to what is essentially a <span>, so maybe that's not ideal.

Dare I say it, this is also the kind of thing where React can excel. For example, I use Reach Router, and by default, when creating links (<Link>s that turn into <a>s), they get the proper aria-current attribute when it's the current page. That's good accessibility you're getting for free because the library was good enough to get that detail right. As much as libraries like React get pointed at for problematic accessibility, there is a lot of potential for accessibility improvements through abstraction. Sort of like the way Brad Frost has been enforcing accessibility best practices in React components.

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Categories: Web Technologies

Come to An Event Apart in 2019

CSS-Tricks - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 10:56

The 2019 season for An Event Apart (the premiere web and interaction design conference) is about to kick off!

  1. Seattle - March 4–6, 2019
  2. Boston - May 6–8, 2019
  3. Washington DC - July 29–31, 2019
  4. Chicago - August 26–28, 2019
  5. Denver - October 28–30, 2019
  6. San Francisco - December 9–11, 2019

I'll be there in Seattle for the kickoff, giving a talk about how to think like a front-end developer. I've been working on it for ages, and I think I have a talk ready that helps set the stage for where we are at in the world of front-end development, through the lens of tons of other front-end developers I admire in this industry. I hope it'll be an entertaining romp through all their minds and how they think.

Just check out this Seattle lineup!

This is like my dream lineup. Except that jerk who kicks off Day 2.

  1. Jeffrey Zeldman
    The Zen of Whitespace: Slow Design for an Anxious World
  2. Margot Bloomstein
    Designing for Slow Experiences
  3. Sarah Parmenter
    Designing for Personalities
  4. Eric Meyer
    Generation Style
  5. Rachel Andrew
    Making Things Better: Redefining the Technical Possibilities of CSS
  6. Jen Simmons
    Designing Intrinsic Layouts
  7. Chris Coyier (me!!!)
    How to Think Like a Front-End Developer
  8. Una Kravets
    From Ideation to Iteration: Design Thinking for Work and for Life
  9. Scott Jehl
    Move Fast and Don’t Break Things
  10. Luke Wroblewski
    Mobile Planet
  11. Beth Dean
    Unsolved Problems
  12. Dan Mall
    Putting the ‘Design’ in Design Systems
  13. Jeremy Keith
    Going Offline
  14. Sarah Drasner
    Animation on the Bleeding Edge
  15. Val Head
    Making Motion Inclusive
  16. Derek Featherstone
    Inclusive, by Design
  17. Gerry McGovern
    The Customer-Obsessed Professional

Another neat little feature of the 2019 lineup is a screening of the documentary Rams that after lunch on Day 2. Like movie night. For us designer types. During the day. It's gonna be awesome.

See y'all there, I hope!

The post Come to An Event Apart in 2019 appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Categories: Web Technologies

Where Do You Learn HTML & CSS in 2019?

CSS-Tricks - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 07:59

The topic of how accessible it is for newbies and seasoned developers alike to learn CSS has been gaining steam as the complexity of the tools around it has become skewed more toward traditional programming. Rachel Andrew has much more to say about this in her post, HTML, CSS and our vanishing industry entry points. Robin also has thoughts on where and how to learn CSS in the modern age.

The question of how and where to learn CSS is a highly reasonable thing to ask. The answer depends on all sorts of things: how serious you are, your current foundation, what other resources are available to you, what you hope to do with what you learn, and how much time you have, among probably a zillion other things.

Let me dump a bunch of possible answers here and you can apply all those “well, that depends” caveats as you see fit.


Books




Our Guide



Other Guides



Web Courses



School



CodePen



Build



Combo

You could read a book.

There are a ton of books out there that cover HTML and CSS (and often together). They probably all do a fine job. There’s no need to chronicle all the choices here. These two are my personal recommendations. You probably don't even need both.

Jon Duckett's is incredibly well-designed and approachable:

amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "csstricks-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_design = "enhanced_links"; amzn_assoc_asins = "1118871642"; amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "bb95f12e1b39017003194cc0206c7266";

Jennifer Robbins' covers a bit more ground and is designed to be useful for either personal reading or classroom learning.

amzn_assoc_tracking_id = "csstricks-20"; amzn_assoc_ad_mode = "manual"; amzn_assoc_ad_type = "smart"; amzn_assoc_marketplace = "amazon"; amzn_assoc_region = "US"; amzn_assoc_design = "enhanced_links"; amzn_assoc_asins = "1491960205"; amzn_assoc_placement = "adunit"; amzn_assoc_linkid = "f0709f0b76c052fa5eeacc12376cdede";

You could read through all the posts in our Beginner's Guide.

We have a guide (a collection of articles, videos, and links) called Just Starting Out with CSS & HTML. I hope there is stuff in there that can help kickstart or augment your early learning because that’s the intent.

You could go through other free online guides.

freeCodeCamp is probably the biggest and best out there. Definitely check them out.

Oliver James has a wonderful online course called Internetting is Hard (But it doesn't have to be).

We designed HTML & CSS Is Hard to be the only introduction to HTML and CSS that you’ll ever need. If you put in the effort to read every section and write every code snippet, this tutorial has the potential to replace hundreds or even thousand of dollars worth of online courses and live training.

Prefer video? Jessica Hische and Russ Maschmeyer's Don't Fear the Internet is a super eight-part series that gets you going with HTML & CSS — it even delves into the all-important topic of typography.

Khan Academy has an Intro to HTML/CSS: Making webpages course that’s packaged in a super cool format. It's like video in that you get to hear the instructor talk you through the learning, but what you see is a real live text editor and real live output. Sometimes the teacher is controlling the code, and then sometimes it breaks for challenges in which you take over and edit the code yourself.

Eric Tirado has an Intro to HTML course on Scrimba, which is also a neat platform in that Eric's voice guides you through the course, but visually it's a combination of slides with a real code editor and preview.

You could find and take a paid online course.

I often join gyms because the accountability of paying for something gets me to do it. I know I can do situps, pushups, and go for a jog for free, but the gym membership makes a thing of it. Well, same could be said about paying for a course on HTML and CSS.

These are broad generalizations, but good places to start:

You could go to a code school or coding bootcamp

If you wanna put even more skin in the game, you could consider literally going to school. If you don't have a college degree, that's an option, although you'll be looking at a broad education rather than a ticket to leveling up your web design and development skills alone. I'm a fan of that just for the general mind-broadening it involves.

But assuming you're going to go to a coding-specific school...

There are probably dozens — if not hundreds — more, so this is more to inform you of the possibility of schooling. You don't even have to go to a physical school since plenty of these offer online courses, too (but with the advantage of live instruction and cohorts). For example, LambdaSchool has the novelty of being free to start and paid later in the form of letting them take a portion of your salary after you get a job in the industry.

You could practice on CodePen.

Not every second of your learning should be strictly following some course laid out by a book, class, or teacher. It wouldn’t even be that way if you tried. You might as well embrace that. If something tickles your muse, go play! I hope CodePen is a rewarding place to do that, making it both easy and useful, while providing a place to connect with other folks in the field.

You could build a personal site and learn what you need to get it done.

That's how absolutely countless developers have cut their teeth, including me. I wanted a personal website years ago, and I struggled through getting a self-hosted WordPress site online so I could have full control over everything and bend it to my will. Once you have an actual website online, and you know at least some people are seeing it, it gives you all the motivation in the world to keep going and evolve further.

The way you actually learn is going to be a combination of all this stuff.

People are obsessed with asking musicians if they’re self-taught. Like, if they are, their amazingness triples because it means their creative genius was delivered by a lightning bolt at birth. They don't need anyone else to learn; they merely look at those guitar strings and know what to do.

And if they were taught by a teacher, then, well, that's all out the door. If they are good at all, then it's because the teacher delivered that to them.

Total nonsense.

People learn anything — music and web development included — inside a hurricane of influences. Let’s stick with music for a second. Learning to play comes in many forms. You learn by listening to music an awful lot. You can do fundamental practice, like finger exercises and going up and down scales. You can learn to transpose chords on a chalkboard. You can watch YouTube all day and night. You can sign up for online courses. You can go to local jams to watch and play along. You can join a band. You can take lessons from someone advertising on Craigslist. You can go to a local music school. You can read books about music.

You get the idea.

You can and probably will do all of that. With learning web design and development, getting anywhere will involve all sorts of ways. There’s no silver bullet. It takes bashing on it lots of different ways. There’s no requirement to sprinkle money on it, but you do need multiple angles, time, and motivation.

Go forth and build websites, the ol' ShopTalk mantra!

The post Where Do You Learn HTML & CSS in 2019? appeared first on CSS-Tricks.

Categories: Web Technologies

HTML, CSS and our vanishing industry entry points

CSS-Tricks - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 07:58

Rachel Andrew:

There is something remarkable about the fact that, with everything we have created in the past 20 years or so, I can still take a complete beginner and teach them to build a simple webpage with HTML and CSS, in a day. We don’t need to talk about tools or frameworks, learn how to make a pull request or drag vast amounts of code onto our computer via npm to make that start. We just need a text editor and a few hours. This is how we make things show up on a webpage.

That’s the real entry point here and yes, in 2019 they are going to have to move on quickly to the tools and techniques that will make them employable, if that is their aim. However those tools output HTML and CSS in the end. It is the bedrock of everything that we do, which makes the devaluing of those with real deep skills in those areas so much more baffling.

Speaking of entry points, I compiled a bunch of ideas for how and where to learn HTML and CSS for the present day.

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Categories: Web Technologies

Parcel bundler: Testing Parcel’s asset support

InfoWorld JavaScript - Thu, 02/07/2019 - 03:00

Last week I recorded my first impressions with Parcel, the zero-configuration web application bundler. The initial experience was great, and evocative of time travel. Parcel transported me back to my first days with JavaScript, when all you needed was an editor and a browser and you were good to go.

To read this article in full, please click here

(Insider Story)
Categories: Web Technologies

PHP 7.3.2 Release Announcement - PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor

Planet PHP - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 16:00
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.3.2. This is a bugfix release, with several bug fixes included.All PHP 7.3 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.For source downloads of PHP 7.3.2 please visit our downloads page, Windows source and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog.
Categories: Web Technologies

PHP 7.2.15 Released - PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor

Planet PHP - Wed, 02/06/2019 - 16:00
The PHP development team announces the immediate availability of PHP 7.2.15. This is a bugfix release.All PHP 7.2 users are encouraged to upgrade to this version.For source downloads of PHP 7.2.15 please visit our downloads page, Windows source and binaries can be found on windows.php.net/download/. The list of changes is recorded in the ChangeLog.
Categories: Web Technologies

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